Brian Spurlock-USA TODAY Sports

Patriots have some success with rule proposals

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Bill Belichick and the Patriots had some success with the rule changes they proposed in Orlando. The team suggested these four rule changes, as reported by the Boston Globe:

Moving the line of scrimmage on extra points from the 2-yard line to the 25.

Extending goalposts upward an additional 5 feet.

Permitting a coach to challenge any official’s decision except scoring plays (which are already automatically reviewed).

Placing additional cameras on all boundary lines to supplement TV cameras and aid the officials with instant replay.

The league announced Wednesday that they would, in fact, extend the goalposts those additional five feet. This proposal stemmed from the Patriots’ loss to the Ravens in Week 3 of the 2012 season. Ravens kicker Justin Tucker’s 27-yard winning field goal appeared to go over the right upright, but officials said it was good, and the play was considered not reviewable. The game was officiated by replacement refs, and the outcome could have been very different had the goalposts been higher.

As for the other rules, Belichick was not entirely successful, but did not get dealt a total loss. The league will test moving the line of scrimmage on PATs during this preseason, but they will move it to the 20-yard line rather than the 25-yard line. And though the proposal Belichick made on being able to challenge all plays got support from less than half of the coaches, the league and competition committee will look into their replay rules this season. Both the challenge proposal and the proposal for more cameras will be included in this review. As ESPN’s John Clayton put it, “Don’t consider it a long-term loss. Belichick has enough coaching support to keep the concept alive. Dean Blandino, the NFL’s supervisor of officials, said he sees a time the league could go to such a system.”

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Tags: Bill Belichick New England Patriots

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