August 3, 2012; Boston, MA, USA; Boston Red Sox former pitcher Curt Schilling throws out a ceremonial first pitch prior to a game against the Minnesota Twins at Fenway Park. Mandatory Credit: Bob DeChiara-USA TODAY Sports

Cancer In Remission For Ex-Red Sox Great Curt Schilling

August 3, 2012; Boston, MA, USA; Boston Red Sox former pitcher Curt Schilling throws out a ceremonial first pitch prior to a game against the Minnesota Twins at Fenway Park. Mandatory Credit: Bob DeChiara-USA TODAY Sports

On Wednesday, Red Sox Nation heard some good news when former Boston starting pitcher Curt Schilling said on Twitter that his cancer is in remission.

Though not a member of the Red Sox for too long a period of his career, Schilling will always be part of the team’s unique history, winning Game Six of the epic 2004 American League Championship Series with the infamous bloody-sock and cortisone shot.

Things may have been on the rise about a month ago when Schilling made his first public appearance in Boston when the 10-year anniversary celebration of the 2004 championship team took place at Fenway Park. Schilling did look a bit sickly then, but definitely not as bad as someone who had just been diagnosed with cancer under a year ago.

Schilling has seen a lot of stressful things occur in his life after his baseball career. He watched his wife battle skin cancer over the last 13 years or so, and also admitted that he had a heart attack in 2011 forcing him to have a stent placed in one of his arteries.

Then there was the infamous 38 Studios venture. Schilling funded a video game company with about $50 million of his own money and with $75 million in federal help, but the company went under a few years ago.

Add on the stressful life of being a professional baseball player and you have to give props to Schilling and all that he has dealt with in his life. Sure, you can find it hard to feel for a guy who has made millions of dollars playing a sport, but there’s no denying that Schilling has had do endure more than most.

To hear that his cancer is in remission is fantastic news and is another example of the resiliency of one of the greatest starting pitchers of the last 20 years. Schilling may have rubbed some people the wrong way both during and after his playing career, but it is time now to recognize a fighter both on and off the field and my hat goes off to Schilling, a man who didn’t give up when a lot of people with his condition may have just given up and let go.

 

Tags: Boston Red Sox Curt Schilling

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