Aug 2, 2014; Harrison, NJ, USA; New England Revolution forward Patrick Mullins (7) and New York Red Bulls goalkeeper Luis Robles (31) battle for the ball during the second half at Red Bull Arena. The Red Bulls defeated the Revolution 2-1. Mandatory Credit: Adam Hunger-USA TODAY Sports

New England Revolution fall victim to shorthanded Red Bulls

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The New England Revolution invaded Harrison, New Jersey Saturday night for a tilt with the New York Red Bulls. Thing’s got off to a promising start for the Revs. It initially appeared as if they would build upon Wednesday’s shutout win over Colorado, but instead the game ended in a 2-1 defeat.

Charlie Davies opened the scoring for the Revs in the 20th minute. Teal Bunbury flipped in a brilliant cross toward the far post of New York’s goal and Davies headed the ball home with ease. Davies’ first goal in a Revs uniform gave his club a 1-0.

New England would maintain the lead throughout the remainder of the first half, which was filled with controversial activity. Davies was whistled for a yellow card in the 2nd minute after he took down New York’s Ibrahim Sekagya inside the box. Matt Miazga of the Red Bulls received a red card in the 45th minute after colliding with Lee Nguyen.

Playing with just 10 men, New York struck right out of the gate in the second half. Dax McCarty scored the equalizer. He was able to beat Revs keeper Bobby Shuttleworth with a 25-foot shot to tie the game at one goal aside.

The Revs would respond with a bevy of chances, but none came to fruition. New York kept applying pressure before they finally moved ahead in the 63rd minute.

Bradley Wright-Phillips took a nifty feed from Lloyd Sam, dribbled by a Revs defender and curled a beauty of shot just inside the left post to secure three points for the Red Bulls.

New England will next return to action on August 16 when they’ll host the Portland Timbers. They are now 8-2-12 on the season and sit in sixth place in the Eastern Conference behind the Columbus Crew.

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